Module 7 Placement: Neurology

NEURO IS VERY HARD.

You know what makes it even harder? Spraining your knee during placement so you’re walking with a limp around the wards. Not fun. Neurology placement was just a bit peak for me health wise to be honest- numerous headaches and waking up with a nosebleed weren’t fun, but I’m fine and got through it, so I thank God!

As someone who struggles with anatomy in general, neuro anatomy has been quite the challenge. To prepare for teaching sessions and clinics, I did pre-reading like I’ve never done before, because I was so scared of being picked on to answer a question and not knowing the answer.

I watched YouTube videos to revise/learn anatomy and physiology, and I highly recommend Handwritten Tutorials and Armando Hasudungan, because they break things down really well. Khan Academy is brilliant as well- forever in awe of people who got through medical school before the internet was a thing, because I would definitely not have made it this far without it.

What got me through the two weeks of neurology placement was the fact that I find it all so interesting. The brain is really amazing, and when you have a basic understanding of the different parts of it, you can start to understand the pathology behind the conditions that affect it. The same thing applies to radiology of the brain; familiarising yourself with normal anatomy is important because it makes it so much easier to pick out abnormalities. Radiology Masterclass is great for easy to follow tutorials and scans.

I had more free time during neuro, as I was back in our main hospital, which gave me more time to catch up on my logbooks and practise examinations. Cranial nerves, upper limb and lower limb; I went through them so many times and it got a bit repetitive, but that’s the best way to get good at them, in order to be able to do them quicker in OSCEs.

One of the best parts of neuro placement was a retired consultant who we had some teaching sessions with. He taught us without using PowerPoint slides or notes, and he’s one of the best lecturers I’ve ever had- engaging, knowledgeable, and just a really nice man! He retired many years ago, but still likes to come in to teach because he enjoys it so much. Not going to lie, I may have cried a bit when he gave us his phone number after our final session, and asked us to let him know how the OSCE goes. What a cutie!

The highlight of neurology was definitely my time on the ward. I got to speak to many lovely patients with a wide range of conditions such as epilepsy, Guillian Barre Syndrome, Myasthenia Gravis, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, Parkinson’s Disease, and even meningitis! It makes such a different seeing these conditions in real life, and I learnt a lot from the patients.

I’m home for Christmas now, and what a term it’s been! I think I’ll do another post summarising the ups and downs of the first term of third year, as this one has gotten a bit long haha, so if you’ve managed to get to the end of this post, I appreciate the read!  😀

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